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An issue that college students are faced with today is the pressure to balance a work life and school life. Growing up in today’s society we must excel at many different things in order to help our post-graduate life. In these days most students pay for both their education and their life outside of school. Both these things come at a great cost. I, as a working student, have to organize and plan ahead when it comes to work and school. I feel that there aren’t enough hours in the day, or days in the week to get my work accomplished. This puts an immense amount of stress on me and my schoolwork can suffer.

http://www.rightfitdegrees.com/online-degrees/success-work-school/

(Tips on how to balance school and work)

http://youtu.be/BmT9cIe-dHw

 (Hunter student explaining her issue with tuition hike and her paying for school)

Hunter Student Speaks Out About Tuition Hikes

As we have discussed in previous classes, they way one dresses says a lot about ones style and individuality. In Ewen’s piece The Ends Justify the Jeans, Jeans were worn by mostly peasants and working class people on oppose to the wealthy. In our society today, jeans are worn by all. Almost all jeans look the same except some are more fitted than others and there are color denims as well.  I view jeans as an equalizer because everyone wears jeans; no matter if it is a brand name or not. Even if it is a brand name, the logo is on the button or somewhere unnoticeable. Today, jeans can be  used casually but can be worn out to a fancy restaurant paired with a cute top unlike in the past where most women had to wear corsets and fancy dresses to each event.

Growing up in a religious home and attending an Orthodox elementary school and high school, I was not allowed to wear pants because it is not ‘modest’ for a women to dress this way. This way of thinking resembles the past where pants were viewed as a man attire only. Now, on aside from those who are observant, women wear pants/jeans comfortably without being judged as “unfeminine”

            

Mass production of goods was extremely helpful to society’s development. With the use of the assembly line which is depicted above, more products were made quickly and efficiently. The assembly line would send partially completed products to workers who each worked on one part of the product instead of having to complete the entire product themselves. For example, instead of hand written books, “life was made easier” by the help up machines such as the printing press, which made produced many books at a short period of time.  The results of mass production not only sped up the process but factory owners were now able to sell their products at a lower cost yet still make a profit.

– Della Mizrahi

Even though Frederick Douglass, John Ross, and Frankie Mae had different stories, they were all oppressed because they were part of the minorities. In those times, they did not have access to the same media as we do today such as computers, cell phones etc. Their form of media was the power of being educated. Frederick Douglass who was a former slave was at the beginning taught to read by his mistress but then was stopped by the master. This did not discourage Douglass to discontinue reading. He came to the realization that education was the pathway from slavery to freedom and continued learning secrecy with the help of his young white playmates. Douglass’s master believed that “education and slavery were incompatible with each other” and if he had access to this form of media (education) he would run away. Depriving Douglass of education forced Douglass to remain part of the minority and stay as a slave.

Similarly with John Ross, the workers we oppressed as well. Those who rolled expensive cigars with their hands held a strike not because they were paid poorly for their tedious job but because they were not allowed to be read works of famous writers. The workers fought for their rights to be somewhat educated through listening to famous , inspiring  and educated writers. By depriving the workers of this, it reinforces the fact that they are minorities and do not deserve the same privileges such as education that higher class-men do

Unlike Douglass and Ross,  Frankie Mae did not fight for what she wanted. Though Mae’s dream was to learn, she was discouraged by her father who made her work on the plantation and as well as from the realization that even if she were educated, she was powerless because she was black. She gave up on her dream and died at a young age. These sort of oppression still exist in today’s society with the Digital Divide. There is inequalities between groups of people who have or do not have access or knowledge to certain privileges such as the internet (media). For example, there are different economic classes that exist today which deprives them from “growing” at the same speed as those with higher economic status. As a society as a whole, we should fight this “oppression” just like Douglass and Ross tried to fight for their dream.

– Della Mizrahi

Imperfections, I have them all,

insecurities for not being tall.

Don’t accept everything in the media to be true,

It’s because this that society has this view.

The image of being perfect,

and feeling not worth it.

The worries of being flawless,

and trying hard not to be careless.

We live life with this pressure and stress,

of feeling unworthy and worse than less.